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Heidi Lovelace Fears No One

Heidi Lovelace isn’t interested in being the best women’s wrestler in the world. She wants to be the best, period, and she’s not afraid of any woman OR man. Her resume of accomplishments against the ladies is impressive enough, but her accomplishments against the guys keep racking up. She’s breaking new ground, everywhere she goes, and she’s proven she can hang with anyone.

A1 Wrestling in Ontario put together a terrific video package on her recent run to the Alpha Male Championship. If you’ve never seen Heidi in action, you will become a fan.

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The Legacy of Chyna

“In 1999, I was fighting guys and winning my first male championship. People laughed at me and workers beat me up because I was ‘The girl trying too hard.’ Well. There was someone like me was on TV. I had a model. A strong woman who wasn’t afraid to fight anybody. That was Chyna.” – LuFisto

“Chyna was the reason I started wrestling…. Horrible news to wake up to.” – Kimber Lee

At the height of her wrestling career, Joanie “Chyna” Laurer was hailed as the Ninth Wonder of the World. She was a Women’s World Champion in a time before “Divas.” She was a founding member of Degeneration-X. She was the first women to enter the Royal Rumble and the first woman to lay claim to the prestigious WWF Intercontinental Champion. She wasn’t the first woman to wrestle men, but her feuds with Chris Jericho, Eddie Guerrero, and others paved the way for shows like Gender Wars, the men vs. women events now being promoted by Mad Man Pondo. Chyna blazed a trail for many women who now regularly wrestle with and against men including Heidi Lovelace, Candice LeRae, LuFisto, and CHIKARA Grand Champion Kimber Lee.

Many fans today don’t know Chyna’s true legacy. Corporate politics and her own personal demons have excluded her from the WWE Hall of Fame and multiple D-X reunions. Chyna was a pioneer worthy of recognition with legends like Mildred Burke and the Fabulous Moolah.

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Ashley America Retires

One of the stars of Girl Fight, the all women’s wrestling shows taking the Midwest storm, has called it a career.

The Women’s Pro Wrestling Network reported today that Ashley America, who recently began working under the name Aura Shackra, is retiring due to health concerns. Here’s the announcement, straight from Ashley herself:

“I have made a decision and I am sticking with it. I can no longer continue to wrestle. I have had a lot of concussions. A lot. Someone I used to train with used to pound me in the head so hard that I would see stars, and when I told people what was happening, they laughed at me. Because of this abuse I became extremely susceptible to concussions. The most recent one I received, my vision went black, I saw pixels of color, and I couldn’t feel my feet. Since then I have been experiencing mood swings, having a hard time focusing, and dizziness/nausea. I simply cannot risk getting another concussion. It’s not worth it. I’ve learned a lot from wrestling, a lot of painful lessons. I don’t need to learn what happens when I’ve had too many concussions. I need to be able to live my life. Thank you to everyone who helped me and believed in me during this time of my life. This chapter is over. It’s time for a new project.”

It’s hard to see people walk away from their dream due to injury, especially when the injury might have been promotable, but it’s commendable that Ashley make the choice she has. Wishing her nothing but the best in her future pursuits. She will be missed.

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Take Your Spot, Ladies

11882266_1060478073985571_1326424868613623308_oThere’s a lot of talk about why Nikki Bella hasn’t dropped her Divas title, and whether or not she will break A.J. Lee’s record for most days as champion. I’m not going to speculate on WWE politics, but where some people see frustration, I see an opportunity.

Simply put: every time Nikki Bella walks back up the ramp with that title, the WWE opens the door another inch for someone else to take the ball and run with the women’s wrestling revolution.

The indies are already years ahead of the WWE in women’s wrestling. Is it really so far fetched to think that independent women’s wrestling can’t carve out a significant niche and fill the void WWE is too blind to see?

They have a saying in WWE and elsewhere: “You are not here to fill a spot; you are here to take a spot.”

Who’s going to take the WWE’s spot when they drop the ball on women’s wrestling? The ball is in mid-air. The time is now!

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Don’t Call Them Divas – This is Wrestling

girlfightWomen have been wrestling just as long as men. In fact the very first match featured in the book Bluegrass Brawlers: The Story of Professional Wrestling in Louisville is a mixed gender match that took place in 1880 when a circus wrestler named Ida Alb issued an open challenge to any man in Louisville for a 3 out of 5 falls contest, just to prove wrestling was not fake.

Sadly, women’s wrestling has never really been considered on equal footing with men’s. Even in today’s WWE, women’s matches are too often booked poorly, treated as restroom break matches before the main event.

It’s time you experience what women’s wrestling really is.
Tuesday Night May 12, Strictly Nsane Pro Wrestling and the ArenA in Jeffersonville, Indiana, presents Girl Fight, a night featuring some of the best independent wrestlers from across the country. You won’t see any guys on the bill. Tuesday night belongs strictly to the ladies.

TNA Knockout Havok will be in action against Hardcore Heather Owens. Crazy Mary Dobson, who just made her NXT debut last week, will do battle with Tessa Blanchard, daughter of the legendary Tully Blanchard. The Lovely Lylah, Mary Elizbeth Monroe, Samantha Heights, and others will also be in action.

This week I’ll be spotlighting a few of these talented wrestlers on the blog. Please understand, this is not a night of popcorn matches. This is professional wrestling at its best, featuring some of the hardest hitting, highest flying performers on the independent scene today.

Girl Fight will change your definition of “hit like a girl” in a very dramatic way.