Tagged in: biography

Amazing Video of Lord Leslie Carlton

Lord Carlton’s daughter, the “Lady Carlton” K.K. Fluegeman, sent me a link to a recently posted video of her father. Not only do you get to see Lord Carlton in action with the nefarious Swami by his side, at the end of the video, Carlton gives a rather lengthy interview. It’s the best clip I’ve found of his lordship yet, and it’s amusing to listen to this native Californian’s attempt at a British accent.

Lord Carlton’s biography is available now in paperback on Amazon.com. Click here to order your copy!

 

Mad Man Pondo: Author?

The cat is out of the bag. Mad Man Pondo is writing a book.

After years of being badgered by friends and fans alike, Pondo has agreed to put his incredible story into writing. It will be my honor to help him do just that.

This won’t be an ordinary autobiography, however. First of all, it’s Mad Man Pondo’s autobiography. It’s going to be filled with blood, violence, and some of the wildest tales ever spun by any professional wrestler.

Second, Pondo won’t be the only one telling the story. This story will also be told by the people who know and love the Mad Man.

Pondo is inviting all wrestlers, referees, promoters, fans, and friends who have a story to share to contribute them to this book. If you have a tale to share, please connect with my via email or on Facebook, and let me know your Pondo memories.

If you just can’t wait for the book, you can pick up a copy of Eat Sleep Wrestle while you wait. The book covers more than a dozen independent wrestlers, old and young, and a number of Mad Man Pondo stories. It’s worth the cover price just to read Austin Bradley’s epic tale, “One Night In Tennessee With Mad Man Pondo.”

A Dangerous Book in the Wrong Hands!

Fans of Tier 1, and wrestling fans everywhere, I am sorry.

I have done a terrible thing.

After hearing Mr. Darius Carter, the current Tier 1 Wresting Champion on the Kick Out at Two Podcast, I got in touch with him to tell him how much I enjoyed the interview and admired his appreciation for wrestling history. I shared with him the books I had written, and I offered to send him a few if he wanted to have a look. Mr. Carter thanked me for the offer and asked for a copy of a biography, Lord Carlton.

Mr. Carter seemed like such a nice man, and he was so gracious to me on email. I had no idea Mr. Carter was one of the most dastardly villains on the East Coast. Now, with the biography of one of the most hated and reviled villains of the 1950s in his possession, I fear I might have only made things worse.

Lord Carlton was a monster. Sure, he dressed nice and conducted himself with the grace of a gentleman, but he as nasty as they came. Like Mr. Carter, Carlton was not a “sports entertainer, nor was he the kind of guy who “wanted to get his spots in.” He believed in winning at any cost, and there was no low too low for him to stoop.

Will Mr. Carter adopt some of Lord Carlton’s dirty deeds as his own? Will he follow Carlton’s lead by traveling to the far east to pick up a sinister Swami to assist him in his conquests? Whatever happens, I take full responsibility.

If you want to see Darius Carter, he’s currently taking the Tier 1 title around the United States on a rampage of destruction. If you want to know more about Lord Carlton and see where Mr. Carter may be headed, you can read about him only in the pages of Lord Carlton: Wrestler, Artist, My Father.

Crowbar Press: A gold mine of golden age wrestling

Just passing on a quick plug for my friends at Crowbar Press. They currently have 25 wrestling titles available with four new ones on the way. Hooker and Whatever Happened to Gorgeous George? are two of my personal favorites, books I highly recommend to any wrestling fan. Visit them at www.crowbarpress.com to see what else they have to offer.

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Lord Carlton book giveaway

lord carlton cover-3My newest wrestling book, Lord Carlton: Wrestler, Artist, My Father, is now for sale on Amazon, but if you’re a Goodreads member, you can sign up for a free giveaway this week!

Three copies of this amazing biography will be given away on October 18. Here’s how to enter:

If you are a Goodreads member, click the link below and sign up now!

If you’re not already on Goodreads, click the link below, set up an account, and enter the contest.

This is the first of six giveaways coming in October and November. If you’ve never heard of Lord Carlton, this is your chance to discover a man whose life outside the ring was as surprising as his flamboyant career inside the squared circle!

Click here to enter and win a copy of Lord Carlton!

The Legend of Masked Superman I

hans_schnabelIn 1940 a man by the name of Masked Superman took the Allen Athletic Club in Louisville by storm. His dirty tactics and roughhousing drew the ire of the fans who hated him so much, they turned up in larger and larger numbers every week, hoping to see him unmasked.

In early 1941 Masked Superman was unmasked by Orville Brown. The man beneath the mask was Hans Schnabel, the son of German immigrants, and a native of New York state. Schnabel was no stranger to the Louisville fans. He had made numerous appearances for the Allen Athletic Club beginning back in 1935. But the run he had in 1940 and 1941 was so successful, he launched a steady parade of masked wrestlers that would continue throughout the Allen Club’s history

Schnabel was born Herbert Moeller in Rye, New York in 1908. His parents had two sons, Fritz and Otto, who were both born in Germany. Their mother died shortly after young Herbert was born, a victim of the flu epidemic that struck New York in 1910. The family moved to Connecticut not long after Herbert’s mother passed.

Herbert contracted Polio at age 8. The disease affected both his legs, but his right leg suffered the worst. It was a long recovery for the young man, and brothers Fritz and Otto would pull him around town in a wagon for the next two years. Herbert slowly learned to talk again, but he was left with a club foot. He eventually fully from the disease and his right leg returned to a normal position, but he was always self-conscious about his legs. He wore sweats throughout his career as a result.

Herbert took a job in a factory as a teenager before embarking on a new career as an auto mechanic with his brother Fritz. They opened a garage in Connecticut and were very successful, but Herbert dreamed of two things: seeing the country, and wrestling. When Fritz saw the money that was possible in pro wrestling, he too took an interest, and the brothers decided to leave the garage for what they hoped would be a more lucrative future.

When the time came to choose a ring name, Fritz and Herbert decided to honor their mother by adopting her maiden name, Schnabel. Herbert chose to work under his childhood nickname Hans, and together, the Schnabel brothers broke into the wrestling world.

During the early 1930s the Schnabels worked for promoter Jack Pfefer, wrestling mainly in New York and Ohio. In 1936, Hans was offered his first shot at the World Heavyweight Championship, but shortly before the match, Hans became so ill, he had to withdraw. Dave Levin took his place and won the Title on a disqualification.

Later that same year, Fritz and Hans left for a tour of South Africa. When they returned to the United States, they were joined on the road by brother Otto. Otto had a tag partner from Denver who wrestled under the name of George Schnabel, but was no relation.

Schnabel worked in Louisville during the late 1930s and had his highly successful run as Masked Superman during 1940 and 1941. By the late 1940s Hans and Fritz were working for promoter Fred Kohler in Chicago as well as several promoters on the West Coast.

By the early 1950s Fritz was ready to get out of the business. He was 45 years old and didn’t have the desire Hans had to continue. Fritz came to Louisville before hanging up the trunks in 1951 for a one night stand as a masked wrestler named Big Red. He appeared once more in a tag match with Bill Longson, looking for revenge against the man who unmasked him, the mysterious “Mr. X.”

With his brother gone, Hans teamed up with his long time friend Lou Newman and wrestled as the Iron Russians. He also worked with another famous mask, “The Zebra Kid” George Bollas.

In 1952 the Masked Superman story came full circle for Schnabel in an interesting way when he appeared on television with TV’s Superman, George Reeves. Schnabel appeared in the episode “No Holds Barred” playing a wrestler working for a crooked promoter. The life long heel did the job at the end of the show for the Man of Steel.

Hans Schnabel’s final match, according to his son Phil Moeller, was in May 1960. Hans Schnabel retired at the age of 52 after a career spanning 26 years. He wrestled all across the United States, Hawaii, South Africa, and Japan. The young boy who suffered a devastating bout with Polio overcome life’s hard knocks and become one of professional wrestling’s greatest heels.

Hans Schnabel passed away on July 2, 1980. He is buried in Chatsworth, California.

Lord Carlton: Now available on Amazon

lord carlton cover-3From the author of Bluegrass Brawlers: The Story of Professional Wrestling in Louisville and the woman who co-founded Kranken Welpen, the world’s only heavy metal polka band, comes the story of a budding young athlete who went from sailor to royalty to artist by way of the wrestling ring.

Lord Carlton: Wrestler, Artist, My Father tells the story of Leo Whippern, a promising young artist from California who became one of the top stars of the golden age of wrestling. Whippern made a name for himself during the 1940s as Sailor Tug Carlson, but when he realized he was just another strapping young war veteran in black trunks, he traded in his sailor’s cap for a monocle.

Inspired by Lord Lansdowne, the same man whose gimmick inspired Gorgeous George, Whippern transformed himself into the British heel Lord Leslie Carlton. His new heel persona made him a rich man as he created drama in and out of the ring, but his family life after wrestling proved to be even wilder than any wrestling storyline.

Lord Leslie Carlton’s tale is a story of triumph and heartbreak. It’s the story of a stellar athlete and a talented artist, an eclectic migrant family, a tragic murder, a vengeful wife, and the daughter who somehow found the God her father never believed in.

Lord Carlton: Wrestler, Artist, My Father is available now in paperback on Amazon.com.

Lord Carlton in Action!

The great Lord Leslie Carlton’s biography is on the way. Just recently I received an email from his Lordship’s nephew with two links where you can get a look at this forgotten legend. Lord Carlton was as big on the West Coast as any major star in his day, including Gorgeous George, and his life after wrestling is a soap opera even Monday Night Raw could never top.